35.018 Hypatima rhomboidella (Linnaeus, 1758)

Status and Distribution

Common and widespread across the British Isles and Channel Islands. Apparently absent from Orkney, Shetland and the Outer Hebrides.

National Status: 

Common

Bradley & Fletcher no: 

858
Photographer: © Ben Smart
Location: Chorlton, Gtr Manchester bred

Provisional Map

Maps updated with all data received by January 2022.

Imago

Larva

Hypatima rhomboidella larva (Photo: B Smart)  Hypatima rhomboidella larva (Photo: B Smart)  Hypatima rhomboidella larva (Photo: B Smart)  Hypatima rhomboidella larva (Photo: B Smart)  Hypatima rhomboidella pre-pupa (Photo: B Smart)  Hypatima rhomboidella pre-pupa (Photo: B Smart)  Hypatima rhomboidella pre-pupa (Photo: B Smart)

The last three photographs show the larva immediately prior to pupation when it develops this pinkish hue.

Dissection Group

Foodplant and Larval Feeding Signs

Betula spp. including B. pendula (silver birch), and Corylus avellana (hazel), see plant distribution map for hazel. In Europe also recorded on Alnus glutinosa (alder), Carpinus betulus (hornbeam) and Populus tremula (aspen).

The larva feeds within a longitudinally rolled leaf.

Foodplant Map

Habitat

Hypatima rhomboidella habitat, Leighton Moss 2013 (Photo: S M Palmer)  Hypatima rhomboidella habitat Lancs 2017 (Photo: J Patton)

In deciduous woodland, hedgerows, scrub and heaths whereever either of the foodplants occur.

Finding the Moth

Larva: within rolled leaves from May to early July.

Adult: can be disturbed from trees during the day, flies at night and comes readily to light.

Similar Species

The long thin shape of the moth and the distinctive dark costal triangle on a pale background make this a distinctive species.

Larval Occurrence

Larval Occurrence

Flight Period

Flight Period

From July to mid-October; has on rare occasions been found in May, June and as late as mid-November.